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Word challenge App: learn how to pronounce and spell 800 high frequency words in English


Description


Word Challenge is an app meant to help learn 800 high frequency words in English, their pronunciation and spelling. The program is divided into 32 levels, each having 25 words. To practice the 800 words, you can choose between 3 modes:



  • Practice: This mode will show you the 25 words of the current level, in alphabetical order. By pressing the “Listen” button, you can listen how it’s pronounced as many times as you need. In this mode, you can access any level in any order.

  • Random: In this mode you will have the 25 words shuffled, with a blank space, that is, a letter has been taken away so it has to be filled. This mode is considered a “Practice mode”, where you can try any level, however, you won’t receive any trophies.

  • Write: Here you won’t see the words at all, but you will still be able to listen to them. Your objective is to type the whole word correctly. This is also considered a “Test” mode, which will award you with trophies based on your score. In this mode, levels should be taken in the order they have been previously setup.


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Symbaloo - keep all your bookmarks and favorites in the cloud


Symbaloo is a simple solution to keep all your bookmarks and favorites together in one place, being accessible from every place you are and any device you use as long as you have your internet connection active.


https://www.symbaloo.com/home/


http://www.symbalooedu.com/


Having your own Symbaloo page as the home page in all your classroom computers is evidently useful: you do not need to tell your students to write long, complex internet addresses (URLs). You just need to tell them which “tile” they have to click on to start working.

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Create and manage your own cloud server with raspberry pi


If you know nothing about Raspberry Pi, perhaps now it is the time to start reading and finding out a little more about it. It is a cheap, small, but powerful computer that you can buy from $35. Well, it is true that if you buy all the stuff that you need to build your own Pi you will spend about $90. But that's it. You have, let's say, a home server with a budget that might be under $100.


You may also decide to buy one of the bundles that can be found out there, like this one by Vilros (I have nothing to do with the company, but it is the one that I bought and it arrived on due time and with no problems).


And then, if your purpose is actually to have your own cloud, you will need an external hard drive (I amd using a spare 500 Gb that I had already purchased before) and a plugable usb port hub with a power adapter as your hard drive will not get enough power from the Raspberry Pi's usb ports. Again, this is the one that I have and seems to work well by now.

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Teamviewer


Teamviewer is a professional tool that allows you to control any computer remotely. It is commonly used by tech professionals to fix problems on other people’s computers from their own workplace.


Cool, isn’t it?


As we said above, it is a professional tool. However, there is a non-professional licence (free for non-commercial use) for people who may use it on a non regular basis and for non professional purposes.

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Booksource Classroom Organizer



I’m using this tool to organize my classroom library and I thought that it would be interesting sharing it with y’all as it allows to have all your books catalogued as well as having a list of books where you can include their AR levels and, of course, codes (although for this you need a little bit more of work, of course). You just need to sign up and create your account and your classroom.

There is an (apple and android) app that is really helpful because it allows you to scan the ISBN code and then the author and the title are automatically loaded as long as it is available on the site’s database. And I can assure you that more that 80% of my books are actually there and are automatically added to the catalog without any typing at all!!!

The rest of the books should be added manually by typing the author and the title. You can also categorize the books with a “location” label that you can prepare in advance to make the scanning process easier. I use this field to distinguish mainly between English and Spanish books, Fiction and Non Fiction, but you can be as specific as you may want to.

And apart from easy, it is FREE. You can access your account online (it is online where the database is kept so no need to worry about backups) and then manage your classroom books and your students (yes, you can actually check out and check in books for and from your students just by scanning their ISBN codes and assigning them to your kiddos) and get your reports and the usual stuff from there.

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Google Slides



Google Slides is the Google App alternative to other Presentation tools such as Microsoft Powerpoint or LibreOffice Impress.

You can create your own presentation using Slides or you can import presentations you have already created by uploading them to your Google Drive and then editing the file with Slides.

With Google Slides, Teachers can:



  • Showcase student work on a class website using embedded presentations

  • Create templates that outline specific topics for student presentations

  • Publish how-to presentations with screenshots and videos

  • Design certificates to print or to send electronically                       

Students can:


  • Create a slideshow with images for a class project

  • Collaborate easily with a group to create a presentation

  • Make a storyboard for a video project

  • Design a comic strip to visualize a complex topic


The advantage of using Slides instead of other desktop apps is that students can share their work online with their teachers and peers (setting permissions to allow only their classmates to see their work) and teachers do not need to send any files as they should only share the direct link to the presentation once they have granted the appropriate permissions.

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Google sheets



In our previous post we talked about Google Forms and the different ways we can use those to collect information or create simple assessments. It is relevant to know that all the information that is provided through the Form can be kept in a Google Sheet.

Then, what is a Google Sheet?

A Google Sheet is the Google online equivalent to its Microsoft Office counterpart, Excel. It is a worksheet, that is, a file made of rows and columns that help:



  • sort data,

  • arrange data,

  • calculate numerical data.

It can use mathematical formulas based on the data in its cells. That is the main advantage of using a worksheet instead of a standard document created with a word processor (or a Google Doc, in this case).

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Using Google Forms to create surveys, quizzes... and much more!


When you have to gather information from different people, Google Forms is an useful tool that helps you store and manage all the information in a single place, where you can easily find it, analyze it, even share it if you want.

This short video introduces some of the possibilities Google Forms offer:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?t=11&v=IzgaUOW6GIs

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A+ Certification Exam Notes


If you are taking the CompTIA A+ certification exams, this is a good place to get some extra info and exam notes:


The Tech Cave


Of course the notes will not replace a good textbook where you will have a deeper look at it all, but it is a good starting point. The chapters' notes are a good summary to review all the stuff you should go through, as well as a resource to find some useful links to other sites and practice questions.


Thank you, Tech Cave! :-)


Android x86 on a (usb) stick :-)



After a long time, I finally have my Android usb-stick up and running. Not a "live" version. A complete, installed, full operative one.


This means that I can run Android on any PC as long as it allows me to start the machine using my usb device.


In my previous post, I had had some problems setting up the wired lan. The lastest version at this moment autoconfigures everything with no problems, at least in the laptop I am using for testing (Acer Aspire).


More info at:


http://linuxbsdos.com/2015/03/26/android-on-a-stick-or-how-to-install-android-x86-on-a-usb-stick/

Turning your Linux box into a web server with just one command...

Using Linux is amazing. It is really powerful. There is almost nothing that you cannot tweak using just a few commands.From running a whole O.S. from an USB stick to carrying your hard disk with the O.S. installed on it and making it run on any (compatible) hardware piece that you may find.


In this case, I think that this is a perfect example of a basic use of simple, easy-to-use, embedded commands that you have available under your terminal window that makes your machine a powerful, incredible resource in just three steps.


I found this article on how to turn your Linux box into a web server using one simple command: python.I'm not an expert on this language but you do not really need to know too much about it to make it run. Just copy and paste, in this case. Thanks to the guy who shared the information with us. Awesome job, sir...

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How to compare the contents of two folders... or two hard drives


I had to compare the contents of two different 1Tb hard disk drives that had almost the same files (being one of them the backup of the other), but not being sure if the sync was updated.


A little research and I came through this interesting page, with a lot of command-line options...


Marco Fioretti @ TechRepublic


...and an interactive comparison utility: meld.


You can't miss any of those two: both the page and the app.


BTW, I'm using it on Linux, but there seems to be a win version of it. Just in case... :-)